Technical and auxiliary work for others

 

for Jenny Walsh

 

"Spin glass is inspired by head direction cells, which are brain cells that create our sense of direction. Head direction cells continually map the direction the head is facing as we move around. When the head turns, new head direction cells fire, registering your new direction and linking it to your new perception." 

Collaborating with Kate Jeffery, a professor of Behavioural Neuroscience at University College London and Jeremy Keenan, technician. Spin Glass represents a head-direction network that is controlled by the head movements of an exploring mouse. With the animal’s movements, light activity shifts through the network such that the active neurons always signal the direction of the mouse’s head, thus forming its sense of direction.

Spin Glass was recently exhibited at the Cavendish SciArt Exhibition in Cambridge and will be exhibited at FENS Forum of Neuroscience in Berlin on the 7th - 11th July 2018.

 

The accompanying music was based on a sample produced from rubbed crystal glass, modulated to make notes of different pitch. These notes were then combined to make chords, with each chord matching a direction. Because the sense of direction forms a continuous circle, the chords were formed as a circular scale, enabling the music to continuously and smoothly follow the movements of the head and the activation of the neurons.

 

for Jenny Walsh

 

"The test tube could be seen as a symbol of science; used everyday in research laboratories to advance medical science. At the Stem Cell Institute in Cambridge, Professor Ludovic Vallier’s research team are investigating the ideal conditions necessary to transform stem cells into endoderm cells, constantly refining the growing conditions to optimise cell growth.

Many of these experimental discoveries occur within a test tube. Inspired by Professor Ludovic Vallier’s research. Jenny Walsh conducted a series of experiments to determine the ideal conditions required to alter the test tube shape, creating a colony of cellular shapes at various stages of differentiation." 

State of Flux was exhibited at Exchanges, Cambridge in 2017 and State of Flux (detail) will be exhibited at Infinite Potentials 14th June – 14th July 2018, SciArt Centre exhibition at ArtCell, Cambridge in collaboration with Cambridge Stem Cell Institute.

8th Sept 2018 - 13th Jan 2019 Infinite Potentials, SciArt Centre exhibition at New York Hall of Science, New York City, in collaboration with the Cambridge Stem Cell Institute.

for Jenny Walsh

 

"The test tube could be seen as a symbol of science; used everyday in research laboratories to advance medical science. At the Stem Cell Institute in Cambridge, Professor Ludovic Vallier’s research team are investigating the ideal conditions necessary to transform stem cells into endoderm cells, constantly refining the growing conditions to optimise cell growth.

Many of these experimental discoveries occur within a test tube. Inspired by Professor Ludovic Vallier’s research. Jenny Walsh conducted a series of experiments to determine the ideal conditions required to alter the test tube shape, creating a colony of cellular shapes at various stages of differentiation." 

State of Flux was exhibited at Exchanges, Cambridge in 2017 and State of Flux (detail) will be exhibited at Infinite Potentials 14th June – 14th July 2018, SciArt Centre exhibition at ArtCell, Cambridge in collaboration with Cambridge Stem Cell Institute.

8th Sept 2018 - 13th Jan 2019 Infinite Potentials, SciArt Centre exhibition at New York Hall of Science, New York City, in collaboration with the Cambridge Stem Cell Institute.

 

for Jenny Walsh

 

"Action Potential s an interactive sculpture that reflects the human body’s neural pathways. The light sequence represents the neural impulses, a cascade of information that travels through the body. The work is informed by the historical influence of glass in scientific innovation and the role of electricity in re-stimulating neural pathways.

The sculpture combines the inert and insulating properties of glass with the conducting properties of copper, used in some electrical interfaces, to augment and enhance the body’s functions. Action Potential is dynamic – viewers are invited to approach the sculpture and activate the light pathways."

This work was made in collaboration with Jeremy Keenan, technician and Devereux & Huskie glassworks.

Action Potential has been on permanent exhibition at the Institute of Behavioural Neuroscience, University College London since October 2017

 

for Yajing Hu

 

"The inspiration for this work initiates from the heartbeat. Just like every one of us has a heartbeat from the moment we are born, it will also cease at the moment of our death. In other words, the heartbeat is actually proof that we are alive. Since our heartbeats are ‘natural’, we tend to ignore them as we go about our daily lives. Or perhaps because our heartbeats are too slight to be noticed, we only tend to notice our rapid heartbeats after intense stimulation. What I’d like to express in my work is that the heart still beats even without stimulation. We are still alive in the world without noticing our hearts beat.

 

My work consists of two parts. The first part is a performance. A sensor placed over my heart sends the rhythm of my heartbeat to a perforating machine. In turn, this machine punches a hole into a strip of 16mm film. Each 30 minute performance will record on 100ft of film. The second part of the work projects the perforated 16mm film at heart height onto a wall.

This work is inspired by my mother’s death. On her deathbed, as her breathing was shallow, I couldn’t judge whether she was still living or not. I could only tell by feeling her pulse as I held her hand. At that moment I was struck by the symbolic nature of the heartbeats relevance to life; something I myself had taken for granted."

 

for Julie Howell

 

"As Greater London has 23,000 people per square mile, it is difficult to imagine how anyone could become lonely, invisible and forgotten in such a crowded city. Yet loneliness is increasing, as are the social and financial cost of this malaise. Isolated living on the Stonebridge Estate, NW10, typifies the epidemic of loneliness now affecting London and, increasingly, other world cities.

The Stonebridge People Library is a community facility designed for the residents of the Stonebridge Estate. It contains the collected images, stories and aspirations of people who live on and around the Estate. Users can access their neighbours’ library contributions and meet with them at specially designed events.

The aim is to restore a visceral connection among people, to place residents’ collective wealth of knowledge and life experience back in to the community and to inspire, reconnect and change the memory of the area for the Stonebridge Estate’s residents."

 

for Olan:

interactive audiovisual system
voice controls sound & light
ecstasy & dysphoria

Live at the Barbican
Actress & the London Contemporary Orchestra : Momentum

additional programming : Jeremy Keenan

 

for Tom Mudd:

“CONTROL is an interactive installation exploring the relationships between artists, music, and musical artifacts. It attempts to call attention to the role that the musical artifacts play in developing musical ideas. A single dial is connected to a single speaker, but the relationship between the two is not fixed; it flits between a range of possibilities composed by a diverse range of artists. Visitors are invited to use the dial to make sounds, and to thus explore the links between their actions, the limits of the dial, and the musical ideas embedded in the software by the artists.”

 

for Nabil Ahmed:

 

"The cyclone captured in the Blue Marble image came to stand for the entanglement between natural and political violence in Bangladesh’s war of national liberation, NASA’s Landsat satellite program, the launch of the Green revolution as a neocolonial system of agriculture around the world, as well as a record of how cyclones can return as affect."

 

Concept: Nabil Ahmed

Sound: Jeremy Keenan

 

As part of The Whole Earth exhibition, HKW, Berlin, Germany.